SmokingSumSoup's Tumblog
allmesopotamia:

Based on Babylonian tablets, Noah’s Ark would have looked like this. Well, five times bigger, of course.
More details here

allmesopotamia:

Based on Babylonian tablets, Noah’s Ark would have looked like this. Well, five times bigger, of course.

More details here

haiku-oezu:

micthemicrophone:

fearboss:

i6nis:

Sooooooo, Scott ( the original Fnaf creator) just uploaded this…

why

Hmmm….

I’m watching you like a hawk, “Scott”…
If you don’t call it “Five More Nights at Freddy’s” we’re gonna have a problem.

haiku-oezu:

micthemicrophone:

fearboss:

i6nis:

Sooooooo, Scott ( the original Fnaf creator) just uploaded this…

why

Hmmm….

I’m watching you like a hawk, “Scott”…

If you don’t call it “Five More Nights at Freddy’s” we’re gonna have a problem.

peashooter85:

Garum —- The official condiment of the ancient Roman Empire

In the ancient Roman world a salty, oily condiment made from fermented fish guts took the Roman Empire by storm.  Called garum, it became an important commodity all over the empire, providing fats, protein, salts, vitamin, minerals, and most importantly flavor to places in the empire were little could be found.  Originally a Greek creation, the Roman obsession with garum would propel the fish sauce to become the most popular condiment in the Roman Empire.

Our modern society is a very wasteful society, we take it for granted that we can just use something and throw it away.  However, our ancestors had a completely different attitude.  Nothing went to waste and everything was put to use.  “Waste not, want not” was not simply a saying, but a mantra that meant life or death, prosperity or disaster for ancient people’s.  So if an animal was slaughtered, it was guaranteed that every part was consumed or used in some way. 

Garum was a result of this culture.  When the fishmongers gutted the daily catch, the guts were not merely thrown away, rather they were gathered by the garum maker.  The guts were coated with salt, layered in large urns, and left out to heat in the sun for one to three months.  During this time the ingredients would liquefy and ferment, forming a thick paste.  When ready, a clear amber colored fluid would separate for the thicker material.  This clear fluid was pure garum, and was skimmed, bolted, and sold for a hefty price.  The skimming of more fluid would lead to cloudier and less pure forms of garum, which were much cheaper.  The remaining paste was called “allum”, and was sold as a budget “poor mans garum sauce”.  All grades of garum were flavored with different herbs and spices, depending on local tastes.

Because the Roman Empire was centered in the Mediterranean, the Roman economy was also heavily dependent on fishing.  Numerous fisheries and ports dotted all along the Mediterranean coast, and where there fisheries, there were garum makers.  Usually, however, the garum makers were relegated to the outskirts of a city, as the process of garum making tended to create an enormous stench.  Garum itself became one of the most important commodities of the Roman world, being shipped all over Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa.  It was issued regularly as rations for Roman soldiers and was even accepted as money.  Garum was also valued for its medicinal value; used to treat dog bites, diarrhea, ulcers, dysentery, to remove unwanted hair, and to remove freckles.

Alas the fall of the Roman Empire would lead to the fall of garum, especially as Germanic peoples who turned their noses at fermented fish sauce settled Europe and carved out kingdoms from the former Roman Empire.  Today garum still can be found, though only produced by small business who cater to specialty gourmet foods.  At around the same time the Romans were making garum, peoples in Southeast Asia were making a remarkably similar fish sauce called  nước mắm, which today is still widely popular in Vietnamese, Thai, and Cambodian cuisine.

Now I’m curious, would this be really that tasty?

thewitchcraftreader:

Here is a wonderful and informative insight into the world of armour, courtesy of feadpool.

This is a really awful modern reproduction, this is why people think medieval armour was awkward, restrictive and clumsy:

image

This is beautifully acid etched sixteenth century (so post-medieval)…

joegran:

wannabeanimator:

Cartoon Brew:

We are very excited to announce today the launch of Cartoon Brew Jobs, a new resource for the animation community. If you’re an employer looking to connect with a diverse community of animation professionals, or if you’re an artist searching for your dream animation job, we’re here to help.

A job search platform has been the most requested feature on Cartoon Brew for some time now. It was important for us though to not launch a job board simply because we could, but to start it when we were confident it could provide appreciable value to both job seekers and employers. Today, with the site’s unique visitors at an all-time high and with resources at our disposal to manage the job board, we feel the timing is right.

It costs $90 to post a job

frenetic-fitness-frazzle:

“No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable.” - Socrates
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If there was a time i would go back to it would certainly be ancient Greece. I don’t think anything could beat fighting with not only some of the greatest warriors in history but to have such a purpose as the saving the entirety of western civilization as we know it!. Also they looked pretty cool :)

frenetic-fitness-frazzle:

“No man has the right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. It is a shame for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable.” - Socrates

==============================================================

If there was a time i would go back to it would certainly be ancient Greece. I don’t think anything could beat fighting with not only some of the greatest warriors in history but to have such a purpose as the saving the entirety of western civilization as we know it!. Also they looked pretty cool :)

conceptartthings:

Mar Shamshir by Abe Taraky

conceptartthings:

Mar Shamshir by Abe Taraky

badasserywoman:

Okay so i got a few notes on how i go about Environments/Landscapes…so i’ll share a method thats easy to work with….bare with me its been a little while since ive drawn them Lol

image

First thing you want to start of with in your gradient background…use what ever is your…

astrodevil:

I’m all about that animatronic furry life mhmm

astrodevil:

I’m all about that animatronic furry life mhmm